blackoliver

a family full of black sheep and other interesting characters

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1

See Dougald Carmichael

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Dougald Carmichael was born in Scotland about 1750.

"He was a soldier in one of the Scottish Highlander regiments of the British Army in the Revolutionary War, and after his discharge at Charleston, S.C., at the end of the war, joined his brother John Carmichael (K) in Cumberland County, N.C., near the present location of Hope Mills. There were several of the Highlander regiments with the British Army in the Southern Campaign, but they were all at Yorktown, Va., except one battalion of the Royal Highlander Immigrant Regiment, which was at Charleston until sent to the West Indies for disbanding in 1784. The members of this regiment were Scottish Highlanders that had arrived in America about the beginning of the Revolution, or were en route and were induced or forced to by British authorities. Most of its members were given the alternative of joining or being tried for treason with a certainty of execution as traitors. It is understood that Dougald (D) was en route to join his brother John, who probably came on the immigrant ship sailing from Fort William, Scotland, September 1, 1773, which brought 425 immigrants from several of the small clans in the vicinity of Loch Linnhe, including the Appin Stewart Clan, of which the Carmichael Highlanders were members. And Dougal (D) must have been a member of the Royal Highlander Emigrant Regiment, as that was the only one of the Highlander regiments in Charleston, S.C., after 1781. He reached his brother in North Carolina about 1783-4, and some time in the next two years married Flora Monroe, a member of the Monroe family of Richmond (N.C.) and Marion (S.C.) counties, who was born in Scotland. He was a brother of John Carmichael (K) and Gilbert Carmichael (F) and perhaps of one or more of the Carmichael immigrant Highlander heads of families, and cousins of the others."

"The lands acquired in Marion (now Dillon) County, S.C., by Dougald Carmichael (D) were located on both sides of the Stage Road, north of Carmichael's Bridge on Little Pee Dee river, and his home was near the old millsite about two miles from the river, occupied by him and his descendants for more than a hundred years."

"Dougald (D) and his wife died 1820-30 and are buried in the old Carmichael graveyard, one-half mile northwest of Little Pee Dee church."
"Immigrant" - Symbol "D" in "The Scottish Highlander Carmichaels of the Carolinas" (written by Roderick Leland Carmichael
CARMICHAEL, Dougald (I601)
 
2
1900 Census indicates that Fredrika was the mother of 4 children all living. Note from Carole McCoy (1973) indicates that Emma was an only child (she had a brother but he drowned in a lake). 
SEVERWINE, Fredrika (I44)
 
3 Louise, Duchess of Bourbon DE NANTES, Louise Francoise de Bourbon, Mademoiselle (I1809)
 
4 Florida Citrus Hall of Fame BRYAN, Ollie Clifton PhD (I12846)
 
5 Parrott & Perritt

The Perritt family originated in France and arrived in America at Georgetown, SC The original spelling was Perritte. They came to fight in the Revolutionary War.

William had three brothers, all born in France:
Needham who settled in Willamsburg County [has known descendants: Merritt (m. Mary Gaskin), Bennett, John (m. Millie ?), and Joseph (m. Sarah ?)]
Solomon who settled in Georgetown County
Benjamin or Bennett who settled in Williamsburg County 
PERRITT, William (I360)
 
6 Rootsweb Profile BRYAN, Jesse C (I6310)
 
7 Rootsweb Profile BRYANT, John (I9315)
 
8 Stories of the 42nd Alabama Infantry

Robert Howell wrote to say that Jonathan Harrelson of Co. E was his ggggrandfather. In addition, Jonathan's son, Enos Harrelson, was also enlisted in the same company. Enos, Robert's gggrandfather, was born March 28, 1826 and died July 19, 1863. He was seriously wounded in the Battle of Vicksburg and lingered for about a month and then died.

The Alabama 42nd Infantry Regiment

The Alabama 42nd Infantry Regiment was organized and mustered into the Confederate service at Columbus, Mississippi on May 16, 1862. It surrendered at Vicksburg, Mississippi on July 4, 1863 and was paroled there later in the month. This regiment was composed mainly of men who re-organized in two or three instances as entire companies, after serving a year as the Second Alabama Infantry.

Paper signed by some men of the 42nd who werecaptured at Vicksburg TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, KNOW YE THAT I________Vol., C.S.A., being a Prisoner of War, in the hands of the United States Forces, in virtue of the capitulation of the City of Vicksburg and its Garrison, by Lieut. Gen. John C. Pemberton, C.S.A. Commanding on the 4th day of July, 1863, do in pursuance of the terms of said capitulation, give this my solemn parole under oath that I will not take up arms again against the United States, nor serve in any military, police, or constabulary force in any Fort, Garrison or field work, held by the Confederate States of America, against the United States of America, nor as guard of prisons, depots, or stores, nor discharge any duties usually performed by officers or soldiers against the United States of America until duly exchanged by the proper authorities. Sworn to and subscribed before me at Vicksburg, Miss this 4th day of July 1863.

42nd Alabama Infantry

42d Alabama Infantry Tablet

NPS Photo
Multiple iron tablet located in the northeast end of the Anshe Chesed Jewish Cemetery. Also a trench marker located on the south side of Clay Street between Melborn Place and the park tour road overpass. During the Battle of Chickasaw Bayou, the regiment was assigned to Brig. Gen. John C. Moore's Brigade of Maj. Gen. Dabney H. Maury's Division, Maj. Gen. Carter L. Steven's 2d Military District in Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton's Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana.

Baldwin's Ferry Road Lunette Tablet

NPS Photo
In the Yazoo Pass Expedition (3 February-10 April 1863), the regiment was assigned to Brig. Gen. John C. Moore's Brigade of Maj. Gen. William W. Loring's Confederate Forces. This unit was attached to Brig. Gen. John C. Moore's 2d Brigade of Maj. Gen. John H. Forney's Division, Lt. Gen. John C. Pemberton's Army of Vicksburg, and commanded by Col. John W. Portis and Lt. Col. Thomas C. Lanier. [Refer to Edwin Bearss' The Vicksburg Campaign, Volume I, pages 226 and 593 and Volume III, pages 779, 870 and 966.] 
HARRELSON, Enos (I9341)
 
9 Henri II d'Orléans, Duke of Longueville OF LONGUEVILLE, Henry II of Orleans, Duke (I1789)
 
10 Matilda of Germany OF GERMANY, Matilda (I2541)
 
11 Roger de Montgomerie, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury OF MONTGOMERIE, Roger (I2179)
 
12 "As you can see Katie and Millie were sisters. But more than that , they were also my
great grand mothers. Katie married Mathew Norris, and they had Dennis.
Millie married Greene Qualls, and they had Minnie Lou. Dennis married
Minnie Lou, which is my grand parents. So dennis and Minnie Lou were
first cousins. Dennis and Minnie Lou had a son, Dewey. He in turn had me. - d norris
WHITEHEAD, Katie Dale (I9638)
 
13 "In 1732, Ann was granted land at Purrysburg, SC as Pierre's widow. In1743 SC census, Anne is listed on pg 211 and her son Pierre is listed on pg 208, living in Purrysburg District.
Birth: 1683
Immigration: 14 NOV 1720 LA
She and her children arrived on the French ship La Mutine. They were natives of du Noele County, Neufchatel in "Swissesland".
It is presumed Pierre, her husband, died before or during their trip. The family left LA (possibly due to the majority of folks being Catholic there) and settled in Prince Frederick's Parish, Craven Co., SC."
Sources: Erin Bibles fshrchik@basinonline.com" 
VALLETON, # Ann (I559)
 
14 "In addition to being a barber, John held substantial interest in the Arrow Shirt factory. He also owned considerable real estate including rental houses. John was the Executor of his father's estate. The subject of the settlement of the sizeable amount of property, even today, would spark quite an energetic dialogue. Apparently, most siblings succumbed to his persuasion and accepted much less for their inheritance than they thought they were actually entitled to. The only one known to have contested him was Oscar, who was successful in court for what he thought to be fair."
as told in The Brewer History by Martha Ann Tillman Gray 
BREWER, John Thomas (I9252)
 
15 "Samuel W. Dew was already serving in the confederate army when his brother, Christopher Tobias Dew joined. It is beleived that Christopher was probably about 37 years old. Samuel and his brother Christopher served in the same South Carolina Infantry Comapny. Then as on December 7th, 1862 as soliders, the two were standing next to each other when they were called to attention. They were in the vicinity of Goldsboro, North Carolina. These pieces of information are a matter of record. When called to attention Christopher stiffened his legs. A large minute ball which he saw coming from the side barely missed his legs but hit those of his brother, Samuel, who fell as his legs were knocked off. The ball rose into the air on impact. The order was given to immediately march. as soon as it was possible Christopher explained to an Officer what had happened to his brother and was allowed to return to his brother's side.  By this time Samuel didn't even know his brother but asked for water. Samuel died in a few minutes because of the extensive blood loss. His brother got a large box in which meat had been packed and delivered and used it as a coffin to bury Samuel in the area of the "Moore's Creek Battleground". He marked the spot of the burial by using an ax in carving a notch in a tree in the hopes of returning some day to bring his brother's remains back to South Carolina for burial: however he was never able to return."
Ancestry.com member tifrea 
DEW, # Samuel Wilson (I20428)
 
16 "So the story goes that my great-great-great-great grandfather was a slave owner in South Carolina at the start of the civil war. When he joined the Confederate States Army he asked his favorite slave (supposedly his name was Ben) to raise his baby girl, Nancy Mincey. According to the story all of the slaves came to see him off and cried as he left and it seems that he probably died in the war."
A story from Ancestry.com member cubuffs01 
MINCEY, # Nancy S 2 (I4234)
 
17 "Stephen Lane born Oct. 7, 1839 in Marion Co. SC and died March 9, 1912 from burns and was buried in Carterville Cemetary, Florence Co. SC. Stephen married Lincey Lee Hursey on April 17, 1852 in at home wedding near catfish church. Lost arm in war, drank to excess in later years. was using gasoline on legs as an arthritis remedy and fell in the open fire of the fireplace and received fatal burns. was known as little steve lane
Captain Stephen Lane served as a private in McKays Reg. N.C.M. and was discharged at Fayetteville, N. C. May 21,1864 for "loss of left arm". Ancestry.com member DavidBranson45

The part about his death may have come from "The Observer" 3/12/1912 , but the rest of the story in unsourced. Unknown why the author styles him as "Captain". klg 
LANE, Stephen S (I4701)
 
18 "When he was about 18yrs old, Ander was riding his horse and was stopped at a crossroads by Zen Shows. Zen accused Ander of flirting with his girlfriend, who was a 'high yeller". Ander denied it several times.

He had high morals. Shows reached and pulled Grandpa from his horse and fell to the ground. Zen was straddled over him and grandpa and has his left arm pinned behind him, beating him with brass knuckles. Grandpa was wearing overalls. He reached in his pocket and pulled out his knife, opened it with his teeth (while being beten)."

as told by my daddy, Walter Brewer
Ancestry.com member jolabga 
BREWER, Joseph Andrew "Ander" (I9253)
 
19 "Widowed" on 1930 census, but husband still living. Presume separated or divorced. FAIL, Inez (I10199)
 
20 ..."the spelling was CHILDERS until about 1850. James Childers and his sister Sarah and her husband George Riley moved from the Carolinas to Burnt Corn, Alabama in Monroe County. James couldn't read or write so apparently George Riley, a business man, changed the spelling to Childress and it has been that way since. We are descended from Abraham Childers who came from England to Virginia in mid 1600s." Barbara Patterson CHILDRESS, # Benjamin Ausbin (I12457)
 

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