blackoliver

a family full of black sheep and other interesting characters

Notes


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1501 This place is listed as his birth place on the 1923 ship manifest. WALMER, Joseph "Jose" Theodore (I456)
 
1502 This record may not belong to these two people. Family F1633
 
1503 this record may not belong to this Pet Johnson. JOHNSON, Pet Anne (I7951)
 
1504 This source gives his death date as 28 Sep 1833 JENERETTE, Elias (I482)
 
1505 This story was borrowed from the
The Bryan Family Home Page-Descendants of Jesse Bryan of SC
Updated March 12, 2010
Bob Bryan14030 Starboard Drive
Seminole, FL 33776-1201
United States
727-595-4521BBryan84@gmail.com
This is a brief biography of my third great-grandfather, Jesse Bryan, Jr. He
was born in the Marion District of SC in 1784, the son of Jesse Bryan, Sr. and
Mourning Smith. He married Elizabeth Johnson about 1807 in SC and the marriage
produced nine children who lived to adulthood. Elizabeth was the daughter of
Samuel and Mary Johnson of Marion District, SC. The Bryan surname has many
variant spellings including Bryant, Briant, and Brian but for uniformity, the
"Bryan" variation will be used for all names in this article.

W. W. Sellers wrote a book called The History of Marion County, South Carolina
and in it, he describes the Jesse Bryan family. All the children of Jesse, Sr.
and their spouses are listed and the author says that Jesse, Jr. "went west."
That seems strange until we realize that Alabama and Florida were "the west" in
the early 1800s.

The Creek Indians who had occupied the land of South Alabama for hundreds of
years had been defeated by General Andrew Jackson. A treaty was signed in 1814
in which the Creeks surrendered all their land in what is now South Alabama to
the United States. This opened up the land to white settlers however, many
Indians continued to live in the area. The Alabama Territory, with the present
day boundaries of the state, was created on March 3, 1817 and became the 22nd
State in the Union on December 14, 1819.

A few years later-probably around 1821-1822-Jesse left SC and traveled to West
Florida and possibly Louisiana before settling near Rose Hill in Covington
County, AL sometime in the 1820s. Family tradition holds that he knew Andrew
Jackson and possibly served with him during the West Florida Indian Wars and
thus became familiar with the area.

During the 1824-1826 time period, Jesse was in West Florida. In a land
transaction dated January, 1824, he identified his residence as West Florida. In
1826, he was living in the area near Oak Grove (about 7 miles southwest of
Laurel Hill) because he was named as a judge to oversee the elections held in
October, 1826 to elect members of the Legislative Council for the Territory of
Florida. This was designated as Barrows Ferry precinct because there was a ferry
across Yellow River at that point near where Highway 2 crosses the river today.

The family lived for a time near the lake that came to be called McDade's Pond
and is now called Lake Jackson located at Florala, Alabama. When they first
arrived, they were the only white settlers in the area. frame. According to a
family story passed down by Jesse's daughter Elizabeth, they lived among some
friendly Indians who would take the children hunting with them and show them how
to hunt. They would indicate what time of the day they would return by pointing
to the place in the sky where the sun would be when they got back. They told
them stories of how an extinct race of giant Indians who hunted with spears once
lived in the area. This might be dismissed as legend except for the fact that
Brewer's "Alabama" makes note of a discovery of an Indian burial site on the
Conecuh river that had giant skulls. They estimated that the size of the
individual must have been 8 or 9 feet tall. Another similar story is told in
The History of Walton County by John L. McKinnon. In 1861, the Walton Guards
were stationed at The Narrows at Camp Walton near present day Fort Walton Beach.
They discovered some huge mounds in the area and excavated some of them to find
great skeletons of men in perfect preservation...they were mostly all giants and
warriors, killed in battle. So maybe there is a grain of truth in the family
legend!

Elizabeth also told stories of panthers chasing some of the family as they were
riding on horseback while they were in Florida.

Jesse's sister, Mourning Bryan, married Jonathan Harrellson and they lived in
south Walton County, Florida in the early 1820s before moving to Covington about
1845.

Jesse's father, Jesse, Sr., died in Marion, SC in 1822. However, his estate was
not settled until 1845 because of a challenge to the will by family members.
Jesse, Jr. received as his portion of the real estate settlement, two negro
slaves. One was named Will and was valued at $250 with the notation that Jesse,
Jr. took him when "he went west." A second slave named Simon was valued at $550.
The two were valued at $800 and his portion of the real estate settlement was
$601.40. Jesse Jr. paid the difference of $198.60 to other heirs.

Jesse was a prosperous farmer and accumulated considerable wealth for his time.
He purchased a total of at least 660 acres of land in the county in the 1830s-
primarily from federal land sales at the minimum established price of $1.25 per
acre. By 1850, he had 11 slaves and was the owner of a 300-acre plantation
having 100 acres of improved land. He owned livestock valued at $875 which
included 9 horses, 1 mule, 8 working oxen, 24 milk cows, 70 other cattle and 100
head of hogs. In 1850, his plantation produced 700 bushels of Indian corn, 2
bales of ginned cotton of 400 pounds each, 100 bushels of potatoes and other
produce. By 1860, the value of his real estate was $3000 and his personal estate
value was $18,275, which included the value of his 14 slaves.

The Bryans are said to have constructed the oldest water mill in the Rose Hill
community. Located on Stewart Mill Creek four miles northeast of the old Rose
Hill School, it was built about 1830. The rocks, parts of the old wheel, and
parts of the old house could still be seen as late as 1950. Jesse served as
Justice of the Peace for Beat No. 4 (Rose Hill) in 1836 and again in 1844. He
was Vice Justice of the Peace in 1837. In 1843, his home was established as one
of the voting precincts in Beat No. 4, Covington County. Jesse was probably
instrumental in persuading his nephew, Elder Giles Bryan, to leave his home in
the Marion district of SC and exercise his gifts of ministry in the new
settlements. Giles became a very well-known Primitive Baptist Preacher in
Covington and Coffee Counties, Alabama.

The children of Jesse Bryan and Elizabeth Johnson married into many of the
pioneer families of Covington county whose names are still prominent in the area
today. The children were:
1. Celia, born 6 Feb 1808 in SC, died 5 Dec 1889, married William Hardy Dannelly
about 1825.
2. Sarah, born 18 April 1810 in SC, died after 1866, married first Thomas Elijah
Chesher about 1830 and after his death about 1837, she married Bennett J.
Boyett, Sr. Their son, William Burl Boyett, fought in the Civil War and was
wounded in the Battle of Peach Tree Creek in Atlanta. I am descended directly
from William Burl Boyett through his daughter Mary Jane who married Andrew
Jackson Bryan; their son Jesse Oscar is my grandfather.
3. Tempie, born 20 April 1812 in SC, died 5 June 1890, married Alfred Holley in
1835. Alfred Holley was the sheriff in Covington county from 1844-1847 and a
state legislator prior to the Civil War. Although he owned 12 slaves in 1860, he
was opposed to secession. During the war, Alfred Holley fled to Pensacola and
aided the Union forces but his wife Tempie and two of their children remained in
Covington County. Most of their possessions were confiscated by the Confederate
forces. After the war he moved to Milton, Florida with his family and later to
Pensacola, where he operated a general merchandise store until his death in
1885.
4. Mary "Polly", born in 1813, died after 1860, first married John B. Sasser
about 1835. After his death in 1843, she married William Peoples.
5. Elizabeth, born 20 September 1814, died 13 June 1907, married William M.
Sasser in 1832. He was the brother of John B. Sasser who married Mary Polly.
6. Jesse Oliver, born 5 Jan 1818, died 18 June 1900, married Sara Ann Boyett in
1843. Their son (my great-grandfather), Andrew Jackson Bryan, married his first
cousin once removed-Mary Jane Boyett (see #2 above).
7. Avy, born 9 Jan 1820, died 15 June 1885, married Emmanuel Boyett about 1838.
8. Susan, born 25 July 1826, died after 1870, married John Boyett about 1841.
9. Telatha, born 30 Sep 1831, died after 1870, married William G. Williams, Sr.
about 1848.

Four of the children married Boyetts, all of whom came from Georgia and who were
possibly siblings or cousins, but the exact relationships have not been
established. In addition to the families mentioned above, later descendants
married into the Cauley, Butler, Prescott, Henderson, Harrellson and many other
well-known families.

Jesse died sometime between 1860 and 1870. Elizabeth lived with her daughter
Telatha after the death of Jesse and died between 1870 and 1880. Family
tradition records that Jesse's slaves carried his body over the fields to the
burial grounds on his property. Those burial grounds later came to be known as
the Williams Cemetery or Williams Burying Grounds after the property was left to
Jesse's daughter, Telatha and her husband, William Green Williams. As of 2002,
the cemetery is abandoned and the land is planted in pines. It is located in the
SE corner of section 24, Township 6N, Range 17E, about a quarter mile west of CR
43. Wooden markers mark a few graves and many more are identifiable by sunken
areas. In addition to Jesse and his wife Elizabeth, others buried there are:
William Green Williams and his wife, Telatha Bryan Williams; William Lloyd
Butler, Sr. and probably two Butler infants; Roger and Nancy Moody who died Sep
12, 1841 and Feb. 8, 1837, respectively; Roan Spicer and his wife Carolyn E.
Thompson Spicer, members of the Chandler family and slaves of the neighboring
families. An effort is presently underway by the descendants of these families
to place an appropriate marker to identify the cemetery and those buried there.

We can only speculate about many aspects of the life of Jesse Bryan, Jr. We have
no photos or physical description of him. But, he most likely had a fair skin
with a florid complexion and reddish hair much like many of his descendants. He
was near 80 years old when he died, a ripe old age by the standards of the time
in which he lived, and he died a wealthy man. He was a true pioneer. He left his
home in South Carolina to come to a wild and unsettled area, bringing his young
family with him. By 1820, Jesse and Elizabeth had seven children with the oldest
being only twelve. Their eighth child, Susan, was born in 1826, probably near
Oak Grove which is about 7 miles southwest of Laurel Hill. Transportation was by
horseback, horse/mule/oxen-drawn wagon or walking. Roads were little more than
Indian trails and there were no bridges over the creeks and rivers. Here in the
year 2002, we can only imagine the primitive living conditions (by our
standards) they must have had. Yet, they came and thrived in the new area. It
makes me appreciate the hardy stock from which we come! The descendants of Jesse
Bryan, Jr. and Elizabeth Johnson number in the thousands and I'm proud to be one
of them.

Bob Bryan
22 May 2002

Sources: US Census, Tombstone inscriptions, Bureau of Land Management Records,
Covington County Land Records, and the research of Gus and Ruby Bryan of Opp,
Alabama who were the pioneers in researching the Bryan family in the Covington County area.

posted by ancestry.com member price_kimberly on 25 Mar 2012 
BRYANT, Jesse (I303)
 
1506 This story was borrowed from the
The Bryan Family Home Page-Descendants of Jesse Bryan of SC
Updated March 12, 2010
Bob Bryan14030 Starboard Drive
Seminole, FL 33776-1201
United States
727-595-4521BBryan84@gmail.com
This is a brief biography of my third great-grandfather, Jesse Bryan, Jr. He
was born in the Marion District of SC in 1784, the son of Jesse Bryan, Sr. and
Mourning Smith. He married Elizabeth Johnson about 1807 in SC and the marriage
produced nine children who lived to adulthood. Elizabeth was the daughter of
Samuel and Mary Johnson of Marion District, SC. The Bryan surname has many
variant spellings including Bryant, Briant, and Brian but for uniformity, the
"Bryan" variation will be used for all names in this article.

W. W. Sellers wrote a book called The History of Marion County, South Carolina
and in it, he describes the Jesse Bryan family. All the children of Jesse, Sr.
and their spouses are listed and the author says that Jesse, Jr. "went west."
That seems strange until we realize that Alabama and Florida were "the west" in
the early 1800s.

The Creek Indians who had occupied the land of South Alabama for hundreds of
years had been defeated by General Andrew Jackson. A treaty was signed in 1814
in which the Creeks surrendered all their land in what is now South Alabama to
the United States. This opened up the land to white settlers however, many
Indians continued to live in the area. The Alabama Territory, with the present
day boundaries of the state, was created on March 3, 1817 and became the 22nd
State in the Union on December 14, 1819.

A few years later-probably around 1821-1822-Jesse left SC and traveled to West
Florida and possibly Louisiana before settling near Rose Hill in Covington
County, AL sometime in the 1820s. Family tradition holds that he knew Andrew
Jackson and possibly served with him during the West Florida Indian Wars and
thus became familiar with the area.

During the 1824-1826 time period, Jesse was in West Florida. In a land
transaction dated January, 1824, he identified his residence as West Florida. In
1826, he was living in the area near Oak Grove (about 7 miles southwest of
Laurel Hill) because he was named as a judge to oversee the elections held in
October, 1826 to elect members of the Legislative Council for the Territory of
Florida. This was designated as Barrows Ferry precinct because there was a ferry
across Yellow River at that point near where Highway 2 crosses the river today.

The family lived for a time near the lake that came to be called McDade's Pond
and is now called Lake Jackson located at Florala, Alabama. When they first
arrived, they were the only white settlers in the area. frame. According to a
family story passed down by Jesse's daughter Elizabeth, they lived among some
friendly Indians who would take the children hunting with them and show them how
to hunt. They would indicate what time of the day they would return by pointing
to the place in the sky where the sun would be when they got back. They told
them stories of how an extinct race of giant Indians who hunted with spears once
lived in the area. This might be dismissed as legend except for the fact that
Brewer's "Alabama" makes note of a discovery of an Indian burial site on the
Conecuh river that had giant skulls. They estimated that the size of the
individual must have been 8 or 9 feet tall. Another similar story is told in
The History of Walton County by John L. McKinnon. In 1861, the Walton Guards
were stationed at The Narrows at Camp Walton near present day Fort Walton Beach.
They discovered some huge mounds in the area and excavated some of them to find
great skeletons of men in perfect preservation...they were mostly all giants and
warriors, killed in battle. So maybe there is a grain of truth in the family
legend!

Elizabeth also told stories of panthers chasing some of the family as they were
riding on horseback while they were in Florida.

Jesse's sister, Mourning Bryan, married Jonathan Harrellson and they lived in
south Walton County, Florida in the early 1820s before moving to Covington about
1845.

Jesse's father, Jesse, Sr., died in Marion, SC in 1822. However, his estate was
not settled until 1845 because of a challenge to the will by family members.
Jesse, Jr. received as his portion of the real estate settlement, two negro
slaves. One was named Will and was valued at $250 with the notation that Jesse,
Jr. took him when "he went west." A second slave named Simon was valued at $550.
The two were valued at $800 and his portion of the real estate settlement was
$601.40. Jesse Jr. paid the difference of $198.60 to other heirs.

Jesse was a prosperous farmer and accumulated considerable wealth for his time.
He purchased a total of at least 660 acres of land in the county in the 1830s-
primarily from federal land sales at the minimum established price of $1.25 per
acre. By 1850, he had 11 slaves and was the owner of a 300-acre plantation
having 100 acres of improved land. He owned livestock valued at $875 which
included 9 horses, 1 mule, 8 working oxen, 24 milk cows, 70 other cattle and 100
head of hogs. In 1850, his plantation produced 700 bushels of Indian corn, 2
bales of ginned cotton of 400 pounds each, 100 bushels of potatoes and other
produce. By 1860, the value of his real estate was $3000 and his personal estate
value was $18,275, which included the value of his 14 slaves.

The Bryans are said to have constructed the oldest water mill in the Rose Hill
community. Located on Stewart Mill Creek four miles northeast of the old Rose
Hill School, it was built about 1830. The rocks, parts of the old wheel, and
parts of the old house could still be seen as late as 1950. Jesse served as
Justice of the Peace for Beat No. 4 (Rose Hill) in 1836 and again in 1844. He
was Vice Justice of the Peace in 1837. In 1843, his home was established as one
of the voting precincts in Beat No. 4, Covington County. Jesse was probably
instrumental in persuading his nephew, Elder Giles Bryan, to leave his home in
the Marion district of SC and exercise his gifts of ministry in the new
settlements. Giles became a very well-known Primitive Baptist Preacher in
Covington and Coffee Counties, Alabama.

The children of Jesse Bryan and Elizabeth Johnson married into many of the
pioneer families of Covington county whose names are still prominent in the area
today. The children were:
1. Celia, born 6 Feb 1808 in SC, died 5 Dec 1889, married William Hardy Dannelly
about 1825.
2. Sarah, born 18 April 1810 in SC, died after 1866, married first Thomas Elijah
Chesher about 1830 and after his death about 1837, she married Bennett J.
Boyett, Sr. Their son, William Burl Boyett, fought in the Civil War and was
wounded in the Battle of Peach Tree Creek in Atlanta. I am descended directly
from William Burl Boyett through his daughter Mary Jane who married Andrew
Jackson Bryan; their son Jesse Oscar is my grandfather.
3. Tempie, born 20 April 1812 in SC, died 5 June 1890, married Alfred Holley in
1835. Alfred Holley was the sheriff in Covington county from 1844-1847 and a
state legislator prior to the Civil War. Although he owned 12 slaves in 1860, he
was opposed to secession. During the war, Alfred Holley fled to Pensacola and
aided the Union forces but his wife Tempie and two of their children remained in
Covington County. Most of their possessions were confiscated by the Confederate
forces. After the war he moved to Milton, Florida with his family and later to
Pensacola, where he operated a general merchandise store until his death in
1885.
4. Mary "Polly", born in 1813, died after 1860, first married John B. Sasser
about 1835. After his death in 1843, she married William Peoples.
5. Elizabeth, born 20 September 1814, died 13 June 1907, married William M.
Sasser in 1832. He was the brother of John B. Sasser who married Mary Polly.
6. Jesse Oliver, born 5 Jan 1818, died 18 June 1900, married Sara Ann Boyett in
1843. Their son (my great-grandfather), Andrew Jackson Bryan, married his first
cousin once removed-Mary Jane Boyett (see #2 above).
7. Avy, born 9 Jan 1820, died 15 June 1885, married Emmanuel Boyett about 1838.
8. Susan, born 25 July 1826, died after 1870, married John Boyett about 1841.
9. Telatha, born 30 Sep 1831, died after 1870, married William G. Williams, Sr.
about 1848.

Four of the children married Boyetts, all of whom came from Georgia and who were
possibly siblings or cousins, but the exact relationships have not been
established. In addition to the families mentioned above, later descendants
married into the Cauley, Butler, Prescott, Henderson, Harrellson and many other
well-known families.

Jesse died sometime between 1860 and 1870. Elizabeth lived with her daughter
Telatha after the death of Jesse and died between 1870 and 1880. Family
tradition records that Jesse's slaves carried his body over the fields to the
burial grounds on his property. Those burial grounds later came to be known as
the Williams Cemetery or Williams Burying Grounds after the property was left to
Jesse's daughter, Telatha and her husband, William Green Williams. As of 2002,
the cemetery is abandoned and the land is planted in pines. It is located in the
SE corner of section 24, Township 6N, Range 17E, about a quarter mile west of CR
43. Wooden markers mark a few graves and many more are identifiable by sunken
areas. In addition to Jesse and his wife Elizabeth, others buried there are:
William Green Williams and his wife, Telatha Bryan Williams; William Lloyd
Butler, Sr. and probably two Butler infants; Roger and Nancy Moody who died Sep
12, 1841 and Feb. 8, 1837, respectively; Roan Spicer and his wife Carolyn E.
Thompson Spicer, members of the Chandler family and slaves of the neighboring
families. An effort is presently underway by the descendants of these families
to place an appropriate marker to identify the cemetery and those buried there.

We can only speculate about many aspects of the life of Jesse Bryan, Jr. We have
no photos or physical description of him. But, he most likely had a fair skin
with a florid complexion and reddish hair much like many of his descendants. He
was near 80 years old when he died, a ripe old age by the standards of the time
in which he lived, and he died a wealthy man. He was a true pioneer. He left his
home in South Carolina to come to a wild and unsettled area, bringing his young
family with him. By 1820, Jesse and Elizabeth had seven children with the oldest
being only twelve. Their eighth child, Susan, was born in 1826, probably near
Oak Grove which is about 7 miles southwest of Laurel Hill. Transportation was by
horseback, horse/mule/oxen-drawn wagon or walking. Roads were little more than
Indian trails and there were no bridges over the creeks and rivers. Here in the
year 2002, we can only imagine the primitive living conditions (by our
standards) they must have had. Yet, they came and thrived in the new area. It
makes me appreciate the hardy stock from which we come! The descendants of Jesse
Bryan, Jr. and Elizabeth Johnson number in the thousands and I'm proud to be one
of them.

Bob Bryan
22 May 2002

Sources: US Census, Tombstone inscriptions, Bureau of Land Management Records,
Covington County Land Records, and the research of Gus and Ruby Bryan of Opp,
Alabama who were the pioneers in researching the Bryan family in the Covington County area. 
BRYAN, Jesse C (I6310)
 
1507 Thomas (and his siblings) seem to be the first of our Lane line to arrive in America. It is unknown who their parents actually were with any certainty. It is also unknown if they came through Virginia or somewhere else, but they most certainly came from England. LANE, Thomas (I643)
 
1508 Thomas Lane was christened in Westminster, London, England 3 Dec 1648. Parents: Richard and Anne. LANE, Thomas (I643)
 
1509 Thomas Miner - Monument Inscription: Leut. Thomas Minor born in Chew Magna Somerset County England, April 23, 1608. He was first by the name of Minor to migrate to this Country coming on the ship Arabella which reached Salem harbor June 14, 1630. He married Grace, daughter of Walter Palmer in Charlestown April 28, 1634. He took up his permanent abode at Quiambaug in 1653 or 1654. There he lived till his death Oct 23, 1690. One of the founders of New London and Stonington: prominent in public office: an organizer of the church. MINOR, Thomas (I2794)
 
1510 Though Elias is buried at Beulah Cemetery, there is a long story about the original headstone and an additional marker being placed in Good Hope Cemetery. JENERETTE, Elias G (I182)
 
1511 Though her DOB is listed as 1901, she was enumerated on the 1900 census, 6 Jun 1900. If 23 Jun is her real DOB she had to have been born in 1899. ALTMAN, # Agnes Elizabeth (I17398)
 
1512 Though her headstone and records have her year of birth as 1901, she appeared on the 1900 census enumerated 14 Jun 1900. BROWN, Essie Bedel (I12347)
 
1513 Though his three children (Cornelia, Thomas and Jackson) name Adeline as their mother, Adeline was still married to Moses through the 1870 census and these three children were born between 1858 and 1862. Their mother was Peter's first wife who's name is unknown. STANLAND, # Peter Thomas (I10511)
 
1514 Though others have named her parents, I am not convinced CRAFT, # Alise Elizabeth (I17477)
 
1515 Though Rudolph Muterspaugh is listed as his father on the death index, Guy's father is unknown. DANNELLY, Guy David (I14896)
 
1516 Though she and her children were living with her father in 1930, Evander was still living at an unknown location. GILBERT, # Anna Blanche (I20840)
 
1517 Though shown as widowed, her estranged husband, Thomas, was still very much alive in 1940. BIRDSONG, Lillie (I5528)
 
1518 Though sources name the three wives of Brychan, they do not distinguish mothers of his many children. The other two wives were named Rhybrawst and Eurbrawst but nothing is known of their heritage. FERCH TUDWAL, Prawst et al (I1281)
 
1519 Though this is his birthdate as shown on findagrave, he is on the 1860 census as being born about 1859. He could not have been born Sep 1855 if his brother Arthur was born Oct 1855. JOHNSON, John A (I3080)
 
1520 To avoid confusion:

Mildred E Lundquist Austin 1914-1976 was not married to Othello Stanley Austin. His wife was Mildred Elizabeth Cox 1916-1980. Mildred Lundquist's husband's given name is unknown at this time. She is listed as Mildred Lundquist (divorced) on the 1940 census. 
LUNDQUIST, Mildred E (I24374)
 

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