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William S CAMPBELL

William S CAMPBELL

Male 1801 - 1873  (72 years)

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  • Name William S CAMPBELL 
    Born 1801  South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    State of South Carolina
    State of South Carolina

    Wikipedia South Carolina

    Gender Male 
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    Note
    • Campbei^l. — Edward Campbell was the first of the family of
      that name that settled north of Little Pee Dee. He came from
      Scotland with a family of children, and settled near where
      Hamer station, on the Florence Railroad, is located ; the land on
      which he lived is now owned by Neill McDuffie. He was a
      sturdy old Scotchman ; his wife was Mary McLellan, and others
      of her name and quite a colony came across the ocean with old
      Edward — some of them settling in Cumberland and Robeson
      Counties, N. C, others settled in Marion County, S. C. Old
      Edward, after living here many years, went West, and all his
      family went with him except his son, Duncan Campbell, who
      had married and settled on Little Pee Dee, where his son, Dan-
      iel, now lives. Duncan Campbell was another old settler on the
      east side of Little Pee Dee, south of Hayes Swamp ; he came
      from Scotland with his father, Edward, and owned a large
      body of land; he married Margaret McEachem, and they
      raised a family of three sons and five daughters- Edward and
      Neill both died long before the war. Edward married Martha.
      J. McCollum, daughter of Dougald McCollum, of North Caro-
      lina, and they had one child. Flora Margaret, who married
      George J. Bethea, of Buck Swamp, near Latta, where they now
      live, and have raised a large family of children. Neill Camp-
      bell never married. The youngest son, Daniel, is among the
      oldest and staunchest citizens of that community, and lives on
      the old homestead where he was born and raised, and where
      his father lived and died. It is a notable fact that may be here
      noted, that throughout Carmiohael Township there are but
      four men who live upon and own the homesteads of their
      fathers, who were the original settlers of said homesteads, and
      who are owning and living upon the same, viz : Daniel Camp-
      bell, Malcolm C. Carmiohael, Daniel M. Carmichael and Cap-
      tain A. T. Harllee, although much of the lands in the township
      are owned by and lived upc>n by the descendants of the original
      settlers. Daniel Campbell served throughout the war in the



      A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 321

      company of his nephew, Captain J. H. Stafford, and was a true
      and brave soldier, undergoing many hardships from which he
      is still a sufferer ; before the war, he married Eliza, the eldest
      daughter of "Hatter" John Carmichael (the name by which
      that old Scotchman loved to be called), and has raised a large
      family of sons and daughters, two of the latter being married
      to industrious and worthy citizens of North Carolina ; the two
      youngest, with his two youngest sons, Neill Murdoch and
      Oscar, living with him; his two eldest sons, Duncan M. and
      John Edward, both died several years ago. Another son, Dan-
      iel Walker, married the eldest daughter of Joseph W. William-
      son ; they live near Kentyre Church, he being one of the RuKng
      Elders ; he is also an earnest Mason of the lodge at Dillon, also
      a Knight of Phythias of the lodge there, a School Trustee of
      the township, and a sturdy, staunch and progressive citizen.
      Another son, William Simeon, is largely engaged in the manu-
      facture and shipping of shingles to the northern markets ; he,
      too, is a worthy young man and up-to^ate citizen; he was
      quite recently married to Miss Sue Campbell, the youngest
      daughter of Hugh Campbell, formerly a citizen of Cumberland
      County, N. C, but for many years past a citizen of this county.
      Old Duncan Campbell raised five daughters. The eldest mar-
      ried Malcolm Stafford, as already noticed in or among the
      Stafford family. Another daughter, Mary, married Leonard
      Walters, and removed to Alabama, and raised a large family,
      her sons being among the wealthiest men about Montgomery,
      Ala. Christian, another daughter, married A. S. Buie, who,
      in his lifetime, was a peaceable, industrious and Christian
      gentleman; they had three daughters. The eldest, Louisa,
      married Gilbert Butler; both are dead. The next, Margaret,
      married Calvin C. Carmichael, and are living. Nancy married
      Robert Monroe, of North Carolina ; both are dead. Margaret,
      the youngest, died when about grown, ffom yellow fever,
      which she contracted from going with her father to Charleston,
      in the month of August, with a drove of sheep and turkeys ;
      several of the negroes who went with him also contracted the
      disease, and some of them died ; Duncan Campbell himself took
      the fever and died also; he left a large estate unencumbered
      for his widow and children. There are other families of the



      322 A HISTORY Olf MARION COUNTY.

      name of Campbell in the township in no way related to each
      other. Duncan Campbell was the original settler in that
      region; he was a unique character. It was told of him, that
      once he was drawn to serve on the jury at Marion, twenty-five
      miles away ; that on Sunday night, while at the supper table, he
      said to his wife that she must he up before day and get him
      breakfast before he started to Marion. He still sat at the table
      talking about the trip to Marion ; that he must be there by lo
      o'clock; that he must have his breakfast early, and so forth;
      at last he said to his wife, "Peggy," as he called her, "if you
      will get it, I will eat it now — it will be in me and I can get up
      and start when I please."

      There are other families of Campbells in the county. Camp-
      bell is a very populous name. Such as I know and know of
      will now be mentioned. The family of the Campbells that
      formerly lived (and some of them may be there now), about
      Campbell's Bridge, were old Peter Campbell, who came from
      Scotland, about 1800, and settled on the east side of I Dee, near where Campbell's Bridge now is; don't know who
      his wife was ; he had and raised six sons — ^Alexander, Archie,
      Duncan, James, Hugh and David — who are all long since dead.
      Alexander Campbell lived on the east side of Little Pee Dee;
      don't know who his wife was ; he had one son, John J. Camp-
      bell, who married a daughter of John D. McRae, in Marl-
      borough; he disappeared or was lost sight of after the war;
      his father was a jolly old Scotchman, was a farmer, who had
      some property, but was not considered rich, yet he lived at his
      own home and had plenty to live on ; he died many years ago —
      think John J. was his only child. Archie Campbell lived on the
      west side of the river, not far from Campbell's Bridge; he
      married a Miss Paul ; he raised four sons, John P., Peter, Wil-
      liam P. and Alexander. John P. and one of his sisters, Sarah
      Ann, I believe, together with his brother, Peter, lived on the
      old homestead together before and during the war ; neither of
      whom ever married, and all died since the war. Alexander
      married and had a family, and lived just below Campbell's
      Bridge ; don't know who he married or how many children be
      had, nor what has become of them. William R., the most
      active and most prominent one of the sons of old Archie, mar-



      A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 323

      ried a sister of Wm. S. Camipbell, who lived and died near
      Ebenezer Church and Temperance Hill ; they had one son only,
      who died with typhoid fever, about 1855, after being down
      with it for four months, the only child. Wm. P. Campbell
      was Deputy Sheriff for Neill C. McDuffie during his term of
      office, from 1857 ^ 1861, and was very effective as Deputy,
      and was also very popular personally; he was elected, in Jan-
      uary, 1861, as successor to McDuffie. Under the then Con-
      stitution of the State (Constitution of 1790), a Sheriff was
      not re-eligible to election to a succeeding term of four years —
      hence McDuffie could not succeed himself. Wm. P. Campbell
      went into office, in April, 1861, just as the war was commenc-
      ing. It was a trying time to a Sheriff, but Campbell, never-
      theless, discharged his duty faithfully and satisfactorily until
      the fall of 1863, when he was killed, near the home of his birth,
      one night just after dark, and when he was actually in the
      discharge of a public duty, by the leader of a gang of Maple
      Swamp deserters. He was in his buggy, and there were two
      buggies along in a path that led through a thick woods, from
      one road to another ; two of the company were carrying a light
      before them or on each side (a very unwise act to have the
      light, as it enabled the assassin to pick his man, the Sheriff) ;
      when his buggy passed, the assassin stepped in the road behind
      him and shot him in the back; Campbell did not fall out of
      the vehicle, but he was d«ad, and his brother, Peter, got up
      into the buggy with him and held him therein till they got to
      the house, two or three hundred' yards off. He had gotten an
      order, as Sheriff, from the authorities, either civil or military,
      to arrest those Maple Swamp deserters, so as to send them to
      the army; he obeyed the order, as he did all orders, and
      gathered some men to go with him up there to hunt for and
      to arrest them — ^don't remember who all the men were that
      were with him; Captain Samuel T. Page was one of them,
      and who yet lives and can tell about it, although in his eighty-
      third year. Thus an efficient officer and a good man was
      assassinated in the dark. The county was then without a
      Sheriff ; Is'ham H. Watson was then Coroner and by operation
      of law became Sheriff and conducted the office until the next
      general election for Sheriff came on, in January, 1865, when



      324 A HISTORY OP MARION COUNTY.

      Neill C. McDuffie was again elected, and went into office, in
      April, 1865, as hereinbefore stated. Campbell's widow, child-
      less, went to her people, and died a few years after the war.
      There are many yet living who gratefully remember Wm. P.
      Campbell. In the early fifties, the Campbell brothers went
      into a mercantile business at CampbeH's Bridge, under the firm
      name of A. Campbell & Co. The business was not successful,
      and they failed about 1855 ; it was managed mainly by Alex-
      ander ; they were harassed for a few years by creditors in the
      Courts, but managed some way to save their homes. Hugh
      Campbell, one of the six brothers, married Miss Absala
      Bethea, daughter of Buck Swamp William Bethea, and settled
      at and owned the land at Campbell's Bridge — the bridge
      was so called because the Campbells lived around it, and
      owned all the lands round about. Hugh Campbelll settled
      and lived and died where his grand-son, William Hugh Bree-
      den, with his mother, now lives ; he in a short while died, leav-
      ing his widow and one child, a daughter, Adaline. The widow
      continued to reside there, and raised her daughter; she also
      prospered and was well-to-do. Adaline married, about 1848,
      John A. Breeden, a native of Marlborough County, and first
      cousin of J. B. Breeden and his brothers, Joseph and others.
      John A. Breeden was in some respects a remarkable man, of
      very quick and acute perceptions ; his habits were not good, yet
      he managed well and kept his property ; he lived on the place
      with his mother-in-law till her death ; after which he remained
      there till his death, some fifteen or twenty years ago ; he raised
      a family of three daughters and one son, William H. Breeden.
      The oldest daughter, Mollie, married Wesley Stackhouse ; they
      have a considerable family, sons and daughters, some of whom
      are grown ; they live at Dillon. The second daughter, Jackey,
      married Frank Edens; they live in North Carolina, and have
      eight or ten children, some of them grown — a first class family
      and are well-to-do. The third daughter, Absala, named for
      her grand-mother, but called "Appey," married Faulk Floyd,
      of Robeson County, N. C, who was Sheriff of that county at
      the time of the marriage ; they live in Robeson, and have only
      one child, a diaughter. Pearl. The son, William H. Breeden,
      a capital citizen, married Miss Victoria Godbold, daughter of



      A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY. 325

      the late Asa Godbold, Jr. ; they reside with his mother, AdaUne,
      who yet Hves, at the old homestead of Hugh Campbell, his
      grand-father. William H. Breeden has no children ; is a very
      quiet man and well informed on most subjects. The name
      Breeden is likely to become extinct in the county. James
      Campbell, son of old Peter, married in North Carolina, and
      moved to that State. Duncan Campbell, another son of old
      Peter, married and settled just above Campbell's Bridge, on the
      west side of the river; don't know who he married; he had
      and raised two children^ a son, named Hugh, and a daughter,
      Mary Ann. Mary Ann married Hugh Dove, near Campbell's
      Bridge, and, I think, had two or three children ; her husband,
      Hugh Dove, was killed, about 1855, by her brother, Hugh
      Campbell — a wilful and premeditated murder. Hugh Camp-
      bell fled from the country and has not been heard of since.
      David Campbell, another son of old Peter, married some lady
      in North Carolina, and went to that State and died there ; know
      nothing further of him.

      Another family of Campbells to be next noticed are those
      living in the Ebenezer and Temperance Hill community. The
      first known of this family was William S. Campbell, who was
      one of our best and most respected citizens — unpretending, no
      display, but gave close attention to his business, and treated
      that of others with "masterly inactivity ;" he married,

      and raised three daughters and two sons, John C.
      and Samuel. The eldest daughter, Flora, married Stephen L.
      Lane, who was killed in the last battle fought during the war,
      at Smithfield, in North Carolina ; they had and raised a family
      of sons and daughters; the widow managed well after the
      death of her husband ; took care of the property and perhaps
      added to it ; she died some few years ago ; she had a son, named
      William, and a daughter, that became the second wife of Mere-
      dith Watson. Another daughter married our fellow-citizen,
      now at Marion, W. J. B. Campbell, and who is merchandizing
      there ; she, perhaps, had other children, unknown to the writer.
      Another daughter of old Wm. S. Campbell, married John E.
      Perritt, whose family has already been noticed in or among the
      Perritt family. And still another, the third daughter, I think,
      her name was Mary, married David Perritt, a nephew of John



      326 A HISTORY OP MARION GOUNTY.

      E. Perritt; he died' soon and left her a widow; don't know
      if she had any child or children. John C. Campbell, the older
      son, married Miss Amelia Tart, a daughter of old James Tart,
      who lived and died just above E. J. Moody's mill, now owned
      by Governor Ellerbe's estate. By this marriage nine sons were
      bom and two daughters; the sons were Byroii, Preston, Val-
      cour, Samuel, Frank, W. J. Beauregard, Thomas LeGrande
      and another whose name is not remembered. Of the sons,
      Valoour, Frank and Thomas are dead — died unmarried;
      Byron went to Texas ; Preston married some one to the writer
      unknown ; also the same of Samuel ; W. J. Beauregard married
      his first cousin, the daughter of Stephen L,ane and Flora, his
      wife, aibove mentioned. W. J. Beauregard Campbell owns the
      old homestead, or the greater part of it, situate just below
      Ebenezer Church, eight miles above Marion ; don't know if he
      has any children. LeGrande is yet single, and is also merchan-
      dising at Marion. Of the two daughters of John C. Campbell,
      Roberta and Romine, one of them' died unmarried, but grown
      and very handsome ; the other married Samuel L,ane and lives
      near by. Samuel Campbell, the younger son of old William
      S., married, first, a Miss Fore, and has already been noticed in
      or among the Fore family ; she had one daughter, who married
      Herod W. Allen, and is dead. Samuel Campbell married, a
      second time, a Miss Hays, daughter of Levi H. Hays, and sister
      of W. B. Hays, of Hillsboro Township ; by this marriage three
      daughters were born to them, names unknown. One married
      James L,ane ; they have some family, how much is not known.
      Another daughter married Thomas A. Lamb; they had four
      or five children, two or three years ago, when they left here and
      went to Florida, where they are now. The other daughter
      married some one and went off ; don't know what has become
      of her. Samuel Campbell's widow still survives, and is on
      the old homestead. John C. Campbell and his wife are both
      dead. Old William S. Campbell was no ordinary man ; quiet
      and unassuming, thought right and acted right; prudent and
      seldom made mistakes ; neither of bis sons were equal to him ;
      he made a good property and transmitted it by will to his child-
      ren unencumbered.

      There are other Campbells in the county, but the writer



      A HISTORY pF MARION COUNTV- 327

      knows nothing about them. There is a family near Hamer,
      Hugh Campbell, ; think he came from North Carolina ; have
      been told that he has six sons and two daughters. The elder
      daughter married John B. McEachem, near Hainer, a very-
      substantial man and a good farmer; they have one or two
      children. The younger daughter, Sue, a charming girl, has
      lately married William Simeon Campbell, a son of Daniel
      GaiiipbeUi who has already been mentioned herein. Hugh
      Campbell has six sons, but the writer knows only two of them
      by name — ^John, I think, the oldest, and James, perhaps, the
      youngest, who was recently telegraph operator and dq>ot agent
      at Sellers, on the Florence Railroad, for some time, now at
      Elrod, on the same road.
    Census 1830  Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Census 1840  Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Census 1850  Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • The last five children shown in this household are children of John Turbeville and Rebecca Bryant.
    Census 1860  Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Census 1870  Moody Township, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Direct Ancestor 3rd great grandfather 
    Direct Ancestors
    Direct Ancestors
    Died 28 Mar 1873  Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Temperance Hill, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Interred 1/2 mile north at Ebenezer South Methodist Church
    hdstn Campbell, William S
    hdstn Campbell, William S
    Person ID I263  Black Oliver
    Last Modified 20 Apr 2016 

    Family Nancy Ann CARMICHAEL,   b. 1799, Dillon County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Mar 1878, Latta, Dillon County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 1822 
    Children 
     1. Nancy Margaret CAMPBELL,   b. 1821,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Samuel CAMPBELL,   b. 1822,   d. 1825  (Age 3 years)
     3. Flora CAMPBELL,   b. 26 Dec 1823, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jun 1896, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     4. Martha A CAMPBELL,   b. 1825, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1869  (Age 44 years)
     5. John Chapman CAMPBELL,   b. 19 Apr 1826, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1894, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     6. Mary M CAMPBELL,   b. 1830, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1876, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years)
     7. Samuel CAMPBELL,   b. 19 Jan 1832, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Oct 1874, Latta, Dillon County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
     8. Sarah Elizabeth CAMPBELL,   b. 29 Jan 1832, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Oct 1874, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
     9. Nancy Ann CAMPBELL,   b. 7 Nov 1837, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Nov 1879, Marion County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
    Last Modified 20 Jul 2018 
    Family ID F100  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1801 - South Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1830 - Marion County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1840 - Marion County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1850 - Marion County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1860 - Marion County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1870 - Moody Township, Marion County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 28 Mar 1873 - Marion County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Temperance Hill, Marion County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S149] 1830 United States Federal Census, 1830; Census Place: Marion, South Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 172; Page: 12; Family History Library Film: 0022506.

    2. [S150] 1840 United States Federal Census, Year: 1840; Census Place: , Marion, South Carolina; Roll: 513; Page: 141; Image: 288; Family History Library Film: 0022510.

    3. [S151] 1850 United States Federal Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: , Marion, South Carolina; Roll: M432_856; Page: 72B; Image: 150.

    4. [S152] 1860 United States Federal Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Marion, Marion, South Carolina; Roll: M653_1223; Page: 84; Image: 172; Family History Library Film: 805223.

    5. [S83] 1870 United States Federal Census, Year: 1870; Census Place: Moody, Marion, South Carolina; Roll: M593_1503; Page: 233B; Image: 472; Family History Library Film: 553002.